Ionian Sea islands and destinations

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Corfu

         

 

CORFU

 

KEFALONIA

 

ZANTE

 

LEFKADA

 

ITHACA

 

PAXI

 

PREVEZA

 

PARGA

 

SIVOTA

 

 

 

 

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With the passage of time the island may have changed, but we can still feel the spirit of a distant glorious past . Its rich multi-cultural heritage, its historic monuments, its stunning natural landscape, its crystal clear seas, and its excellent weather all year round explain why Corfu is one of the most cosmopolitan Mediterranean destinations weaving a powerful spell on its visitors.

Corfu (Kérkyra), unlike the rest of Greece, never fell under the Ottoman oppression. Due to the successive dominations of the Venetians, the French and the British over the centuries, the island has primarily become part of the Western rather the Levantine world. Their culture wielded strong influence in the city: it was here that the first Greek University (the Ionian Academy), the first Philharmonic Orchestra and the First School of Fine Arts were founded.

In the beautifully preserved Old Town of Corfu, a UNESCO world heritage site, Renaissance, Baroque and Classical “repertoire” came to be successfully applied to local artistic traditions. Palaces, fortresses, austere public buildings of the Venetian rule uniquely blend with lines of drying washing in tiny alleyways and small secluded squares. Strolling through a complex of narrow cobbled streets with stairways and vaulted passages, the so-called “kantoúnia”, will make you feel as if you’ve travelled to Genoa or Naples. See more

       
      Kefalonia
       
     

This lush green island with breathtaking beaches and crystal clear waters of greenish-blue colours will leave you speechless. Kefalonia glows in the Ionian Sea and carries a rich history in cultural tradition. It’s the biggest Ionian Island and the green of its mountains blend with the blue of the water making it truly unique and a beloved destination. Pine, cypress and olive trees cover Mt. Ainos' peak, while at its foot you’ll encounter vineyards where the popular Kefalonian Robola wine variety is produced.

 

If you happen to love snorkeling or diving then the island’s amazing seabed will definitely satisfy you. You might even get the chance to encounter the rare, caretta caretta, sea turtles that take refuge here, as well as the monk seals monachus monachus. Kefalonia’s culinary tradition, history, picturesque villages, upbeat nightlife and pristine beaches will make you fall in love with the island.

 

The biggest town of the island and the live capital of the island is Argostoli, a town built amphitheatrically, with intense city life and active, full of various types of entertainment: shops for every taste, coffee to relax, bars and beaches nearby. Although Argostoli was totally ruined by the earthquake dated since 1953, there are still sites that depict the old venetian architecture. You can see the old town Krani with the Cyclopean Walls, you can walk on the pedestrian street, where if you have the opportunity you may encounter the local philharmonic orchestra playing traditional ionian songs; you can complete your promenade strolling through the dock. The Archaeological Museum with findings from areas of the island and the Korgialeneios Library with a rare collection of books and manuscripts that operates as folklore museum are of great interest. If you enjoy night life, you can find clubs where you can stay until dawn. See more

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Zante

 

 

 

 
     

Zante is the flower of the East. Zákynthos (Zante) is a verdant island endowed with fertile valleys and a temperate climate (area: 406 sq. km; coastline: 123 km). Its landscape diversity has resulted in different types of beaches: there are sandy beaches in secluded coves where the tranquil waters are deep blue on the island’s southeastern part; yet, if rugged cliffs and an interesting underwater world are to your liking, try the western part of the island.

The Venetians, who ruled Zákynthos from 1484 to 1797, called the island “Fioro di Levante” (flower of the East) as there are over 7,000 species of flowers on Zákynthos. The third largest island of the Ionian Sea, after Corfu and Kefaloniá, is internationally known as “Zante”. Zákynthos is said to have been the island’s first inhabitant and the ancient acropolis is attributed to him. He was the son of Dardanos who ruled the ancient kingdom of Frigia. A Venetian fort was built at later times on the site.

The Venetian architectural influence has left its stamp on Zante despite the damage sustained due to the seismic activity in the area. After the ravaging 1953 earthquake and the ensuing fire, a number of historical buildings and churches burned to the ground. Consequently, the significant treasures these buildings were housing perished. The town was rebuilt according to a plan where strict anti-seismic specifications applied and, to a large extent, respecting the town’s former architectural structure. On Zante, great care is taken to protect two endangered animal species, namely the caretta aretta sea turtle and the monachus monachus seal. The city of Zakynthos is the capital of the island and at the same time the island's port. See more

       
        Lefkada
         


 

 


   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

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Lefkada is surrounded by a total of 24 islets - Aristotle Onassis’ Skorpios being one of them. It connects to the opposite coast of Central Greece via a floating swing bridge (length: 50 m). The bridge offers easy access to Lefkada to visitors from all over Greece. On Lefkada you will find noteworthy sights, churches and monasteries, picturesque villages, lush vegetation, idyllic coves of transparent, turquoise waters, busy and secluded beaches of stunning beauty, a significant cultural heritage and hospitable locals.

 

Lefkada is the island’s capital and port town. The town planning is a very particular one and resembles a “fish backbone”. There are picturesque alleys, small squares, traditional houses, elaborate belfries and paved pedestrian zones that give this town its character. The city is surrounded by a canal and a lagoon, while, farther north, lies Gyra, a thin stretch of a sandy beach forming a circle, dotted with windmills and scant vegetation. See more

       
      Ithaca
       
     

When Odysseus set off for glorious days in Troy, his beloved wife, Penelope, was left alone to unwittingly excite the appetite of men for a gorgeous queen. Before long, the palace was brimful of odious suitors who would flirt with the queen persistently. What is more, they made Penelope promise she would marry one of them. To keep them at bay, she came up with a devise: she promised she would come to a wedding with the best of them when she would have finished weaving a shroud. So, she spent the daytime weaving it and the nighttime unweaving it. Thus doing, she managed to stay clear of the suitors for 20 whole years, until Odysseus returned to Ithaca.

“Keep Ithaca always in your mind. Arriving there is what you are destined for”

Worldwide famous as the home of Odysseus, Ithaca symbolises the return to the haven, the discovery and the fulfillment. Despite its proximity to Kefalonia (Cephalonia) (2km northeast) it is much more peaceful, quiet and undiscovered from it, thus being an ideal place for alternative activities and a holiday living up to the standards of the most demanding ones amongst us. With its 27-kilometre long and 6.5-kilometre large mountainous surface, it boasts plenty of hiking as well as mountain bike trails in a sequence of blue and green alongside the coast and through olive, cypress, pine, oak, arbutus and carob trees up on the hills.

Scuba diving and sea kayaking are some of the options too, while the Cave of the Nymph will give you the chance to combine an exciting visit with a myth: Odysseus had hidden there the gifts he had brought along from the land of the Phaeacians.

       
      Paxi
       
     

Cultural village of Europe for the year 2004, Paxi (or Paxoi) is the ideal island for a peaceful holiday. Fjord-shaped beaches, underwater caves, small bays and green hills welcome the lucky visitors. According to the legend, the island would be the southernmost tip of Corfu, if the God of the Sea, Poseidon, had not broken it off with his trident when he needed a god-deserving place to live his love with the Nereid Amphitrite. Its capital and main port, Gaios (Gáios), is separated from its natural breakwater, the tiny island of Agios Nikolaos (Saint Nicholas), by a narrow channel, displaying one of the most beautiful port sceneries in Greece.

Not to be missed:

• the Venetian fortress of Agios Nikolaos

• the English Governor’s House

• the Paxi Museum and the churches and chapels of the area.

Visit the picturesque villages of Lóggos, Lákka and Oziás, tucked away in pine and olive trees. In the areas of Oziás, Yaná and Glyfáda, sulphur thermal springs offer an alternative treatment for rheumatics and other health conditions. Innumerable ravishing beaches await the fitter ones as a starting point for scuba diving into underwater caves and shipwrecks, and for top-notch windsurfing. It sounds pretty interesting to walk through the vast olive groves inland. In the area of Magaziá, don’t forget to drop by the Olive Museum, once a traditional olive press. In the areas of Agia Eleoussa, Vlahopouliátika and Boycática look for the clusters of stone cisterns, carved on the rocks as rainwater collectors.

       
      Parga
       
     

Parga (Greek: Πάργα [ˈpaɾɣa]) is a town and municipality located in the northwestern part of the regional unit of Preveza in Epirus, northwestern Greece. The seat of the municipality is the village Kanallaki. Parga lies on the Ionian coast between the cities of Preveza and Igoumenitsa. It is a resort town known for its scenic beauty.

 

In antiquity the area was inhabited by the Greek tribe of the Thesprotians. The ancient town of Toryne was probably located here. The village of Parga stands from the early 13th century. It was originally built on top of the mountain "Pezovolo". In 1360 the Pargians, in order to avoid the attacks of the Magrebins, transferred the village to its present location. During that period, with the help of the Normans, who held the island of Corfu, the fortress of Parga was built. In 1401 a treaty was signed with the Venetians, and the rule of Ionian Islands passed to them. The Venetians respected the lifestyle of the Pargians who provided, in turn, invaluable assistance to the fleet of the Venetians. At the same time the Pargians fought by the side of their compatriots to throw off the Ottoman rule. As Parga was the only free Christian village of Epirus, it was a perfect refuge for persecuted fighters and their families. In 1797 the area, along with the Ionian Islands and Parga, fell into the hands of the French, and in 1800, proclaimed free city status with broad authority under the protection of the Sublime Porte. In 1815, with the fortunes of the French failing, the citizens of Parga revolted against French rule and sought the protection of the British.

 

In 1817, following a treaty between Britain and the Ottoman Empire, the British granted Parga to the Ottomans. This resulted in the Good Friday of 1819 where 4,000 Pargians, having with them the ashes of the bones of their ancestors, their sacred images, flags and a handful of soil from their homeland, exiled themselves in the British protecturate of Corfu where they settled. The former citizens of Parga never ceased to dream of returning to a free country and to participate actively in the struggle for liberation. But they had to wait almost 100 years for this. Parga and the rest of Epirus was liberated from the Ottoman rule on 1913 following the victory of Greece in the Balkan Wars.

       
      Sivota
       
     

Syvota  is a village and a former municipality in Thesprotia, Epirus, Greece. Since the 2011 local government reform it is part of the municipality Igoumenitsa, of which it is a municipal unit.The population in 2011 was 875 for the village, and 2,640 for the municipal unit. The seat of the municipality was in Plataria. The earliest recorded inhabitants of the region are the Thesprotians, a Greek tribe of Epirus. In antiquity, the location was called Sybota and was the site of the Battle of Sybota. During the Middle Ages, Syvota, like the rest of Epirus, was part of the Byzantine Empire and the Despotate of Epirus. Under the Turks, it was called Mourtos.

 

After nearly 500 years of Ottoman rule, Syvota joined Greece in 1913, following the Balkan Wars. The coastal village of Syvota (Albanian: Murto or Vola) was home to Cham Albanians before 1944, when they were expelled for collaborating with the Axis Powers. Today, Syvota town is a well-developed resort, owing largely to the numerous pristine beaches with clear waters located on several islets immediately offshore.

       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

       
       
       
       
       
       

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Igoumenitsa
Corfu+10,00 €
Parga+10,00 €
Preveza+15,00 €
Lefkada+20,00 €
Sivota-Plataria
Igoumenitsa
Corfu+10,00 €
Parga+10,00 €
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Lefkada+20,00 €
Sivota-Plataria
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